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312-423-4200
Union Health Service Inc.
1634 West Polk Street
Chicago, IL 60612
webmaster@unionhealth.org
312-423-4200 Ext. 3231
Union Health Service Inc.
1634 West Polk Street
Chicago, IL 60612
312-423-4200 ext. 3262
Union Health Service Inc.
1634 West Polk Street
Chicago, IL 60612

We are described as many things, such as — a Voluntary Health Services Plans Corporation; a multi-specialty medical group; a not-for-profit health plan; or a staff-model managed care plan. Maybe it is simply best to call us "Union Health Service" or “UHS” — a tradition of providing high quality and cost-effective benefits to groups covering Chicago-area union members.

Good Ideas Catch On

Good ideas often pass the test of time. Many aspects of the way in which Union Health Service provides healthcare were innovative when we were organized in the 1950s. The innovation even required the passage of a new Illinois law (the Voluntary Health Services Plans Act) so that we could directly provide insured health care services through our own staff of physicians. Key provisions of the Act address: free choice of any staff physician; the private physician-patient relationship; confidentiality; no restrictions on the physician’s methods of diagnosis or treatment; and the inclusion of physicians in the company’s top management.

We took advantage of the new law to encourage members to select a primary care physician (PCP)

 

who, in turn, is involved in all aspects of the member’s care — coordination with specialty physicians; health education, and providing preventive services as well as follow-up care. Other “ahead-of-their-time" programs installed at UHS included: podiatry; colon cancer screening; electronic medical records; nutrition counseling.

And eventually good ideas catch on. The news is full of stories these days about encouraging health care trends, such as, the prominence of primary care physician, preventive care, health education, and electronic medical records. We agree; and have done so for a very long time.

News
New Pharmacy Hours
Effective June 30, 2014, Pharmacy hours have been extended on weekdays and Saturdays to cater to the varying needs of UHS plan members. New Pharmacy hours are:
 
Monday, Wednesday, Friday 7:00 AM – 6:00 PM
Tuesday and Thursday 7:00 AM – 7:00 PM
Saturday 9:00 AM – 2:00 PM
Closed Sundays and Major Holidays

Dealing with West Nile Virus

This summer all the way into fall, the spread of a seasonal virus such as the West Nile Virus (WNV) is most commonly transmitted to humans by mosquitoes. There are no medications to treat or vaccines to prevent WNV infection. Fortunately, most people infected with WNV will have no symptoms.

About 1 in 5 people who are infected will develop a fever with other symptoms such as headache, muscle ache, exhaustion, skin rash, swollen lymph glands, and in severe case, Encephalitis, which can be fatal. However, less than 1% of infected people develop a serious, sometimes fatal, neurologic illness. Contact your UHS primary care physician immediately if symptoms persist.

The most effective way to avoid WNV disease is to prevent mosquito bites, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).

Avoid Mosquito Bites

  • Use insect repellents when you go outdoors.
  • When weather permits, wear long sleeves, long pants, and socks when outdoors.
  • Take extra care during peak mosquito biting hours, during dusk and dawn.
Mosquito-Proof Your Home

Install or repair screens on windows and doors to keep mosquitoes outside. Use your air conditioning, if you have it.
Help reduce the number of mosquitoes around your home by emptying standing water from flowerpots, gutters, buckets, pool covers, pet water dishes, discarded tires, and birdbaths on a regular basis.

Help Your Community West Nile Virus Surveillance and Control Programs
 
Support your local community mosquito control programs. Report dead birds to local authorities. Dead birds may be a sign that West Nile virus is circulating between birds and the mosquitoes in an area.

The chance of becoming ill from a single mosquito bite remains low. Over-the-counter pain relievers can be used to reduce fever and relieve some symptoms. Please consult your UHS Pharmacist for more options. In severe cases, patients often need to be hospitalized to receive supportive treatment, such as intravenous fluids, pain medication, and nursing care. Don’t wait until you experience a severe symptom. Visit a UHS clinic close to your home immediately for evaluation and treatment.


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